Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October 1st, 2013

The tools I create and work with are pinhole cameras. With pinhole photography, the same air that touches my subject can pass through the pinhole and touch the photo emulsion on the film. There’s no barrier between the two. There are no lenses changing and manipulating light. There are no chips converting light to binary code. With pinhole what you get is an unmanipulated true representation of a segment of light and time, a pure reflection of what is at that moment. With some exposure times getting close to 2 hours, it’s an unsegmented movie from a movie camera with only one frame.

–Wayne Martin Belger

*****************

Wayne Martin Belger-Yama Pinhole Camera

Wayne Martin Belger-Yama Pinhole Camera

I recently came across the very intriguing work of Wayne Martin Belger, a contemporary artist/photographer working out of the Los Angeles area.  He makes pinhole cameras from found and unusual materials and uses the cameras to photograph scenes related to the theme of the camera.  Pinhole cameras are very simple in their nature but Belger’s creations are nothing like the shoebox or milkcarton cameras from one’s childhood.  They are elegant and strange, often elaborate in their construction.  The images he pulls from these cameras are often just as elegant and strange.  For example , Belger has a camera called Roadside Altar which , of course, he uses to photograph  the altars that are erected at the sight of fatal road accidents.   His website,  Boy of Blue Industries, tells this story  as well as give complete backgrounds on all of his cameras and Belger himself.  Fascinating stuff which I encourage you to investigate further.

Wayne Martin Belger-Wood Camera

Wayne Martin Belger-Wood Camera

One of my favorites, among many here, is the Wood Camera, which Belger describes as being designed to study distance.  He writes on his site:  The Wood Camera is made from Wood, Aluminum, Copper, Steel, Acrylic, and Insects. Most of the camera parts were found in Death Valley, CA. The camera has an interchangeable front plate used to float objects in front of the pinhole. With pinhole photography the focus is infinite. Objects which are a quarter-inch in front of the pinhole are just as in focus as objects 20 miles away.

He floats small objects in front of the pinhole to create great juxtapositions as both the object and the scene in the far distance remain in focus.  It made me realize that I often paint as though I were a pinhole camera.

Wayne Martin Belger-Wood Camera Photo

Wayne Martin Belger-Wood Camera Photo

Wayne Martin Belger-Wood Camera Photo 2

Wayne Martin Belger-Wood Camera Photo 2

Here is the Deer Camera which is used to take photos of deer, of course.  Again, for more info on this work, check out his site.

Wayne Martin Belger-Deer Pinhole Camera Front View Wayne Martin Belger-Antilocapraamericana (Mother & Babies)

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: