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Posts Tagged ‘Led Zeppelin’

“Breakout” Currently at the West End Gallery

Not much to say here today.

This week marks the last chance to see my Moments and Color show at the West End Gallery. The show ends this coming Friday, August 30.

My Icons & Exiles show will hang until September 20 at the Patterson Library Octagon Gallery in Westfield, NY. There will be an Art Talk there on Thursday, September 12 at 6 PM.

I am in the process of getting ready for my 17th annual Gallery Talk at the Principle Gallery in Alexandria, VA. It takes place on Saturday, September 21, beginning at 1 PM. I am looking for a prize to give away that equals the 1970 Gremlin from the West End Gallery talk earlier month. This is going to be a tough task.

I thought I’d play a video this morning to kick off the week with some energy. It’s a video of Led Zeppelin from 50 years ago, in March of 1969, playing live in a Danish television studio. This was just after the release of their first album. In another video from this session you can see the small audience file in and sit in a semi circle around the band. There are maybe 50 or 60 people, at best. And they played like they were in front of a full arena. It’s a great but long performance, over 12 minutes long, but the first couple of minutes are definitely worth a look. Have a good day and here’s How Many More Times.

 

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Ormond Gigli  Girls InTh Windows New York 1960 --Stanley-Wise Gallery NYCOrmond Gigli is an American photographer born in 1925 who is famous for his photos of celebrities from the worlds of stage, screen and fashion.  I recently came across his most famous photo (above) which is called Girls In the Windows.  It is considered to be one of the great fashion shots of the 1960’s and just a great photo in any category.

The photo came about in 1960 when a group of brownstones in Manhattan were being demolished across the street from Gigli’s  East 58th Street studio.  Gigli wanted to capture those brownstones on film and had a vision of 43 fashion-clad women adorning the windows.  Working quickly, arrangements were made to get permissions, models and the Rolls-Royce in place so that the photo could be taken during the workmen’s lunch break before the buildings hit the ground.  Some of the models couldn’t stand on the windowsills as they were so crumbly.

It’s a stunning visual.  You never know what will inspire something new in your own work and looking at a photo like this triggers all sorts of reactions within my mind.  I am sure this was the same for others who sort of borrowed from this photo in the years after it was taken.  For instance, I am pretty sure the artist who did the cover for Led Zeppelin‘s 1975 album, Physical Graffiti was inspired in some way by Gigli’s photo to place iconic images in the windows of a crumbling apartment building.

Ormond Gigli has a website devoted to his work and the stories behind some of his more famous shots that you can visit by clicking here.

Led Zeppelin Physical Graffiti Album Cover 1975

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A number of years back, I saw an exhibit at a NYC gallery that consisted of many, many versions of The Last Supper by Leoanrdo Da Vinci, all painted by painters of differing skill levels and styles.  Some were well executed, professional, and some were crude and amateurish.  But they all, especially in the context of the exhibit, had a vibrancy that came from the original composition.  It was a very interesting show and I carry strong memories of some of those versions of DaVinci’s masterpiece.

I was reminded of this when I came across this version of the rock classic Whole Lotta Love from Led Zeppelin.  It’s from the San Francisco based band The Waybacks (featuring guest vocalist John Cowan from New Grass  Revival) and is from a performance at Merlefest in 2008.  Merlefest is an annual festival of  folk and Americana music that takes place in Wilkesboro, North Carolina.  It was started by the great Doc Watson in 1988 to honor his son and guitar playing stage partner, Merle, who had died a few years earlier in a tractor accident. 

I thought of The Last Supper show from this because it’s often interesting to see how a composition works in different genres and styles. This version from The Waybacks is based on acoustic instruments but  still maintains the  potency of the original, while forming a slightly difefrent feel and translation.  I’ve talked about this in this post before when I painted a series of gray and black pieces based on my typical landscapes.  They were the same but had a different  feel with the differing treatment.

That’s how this feels– the same but different.

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